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Second Life - Second Capitalism

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Vorheriger: Hard Tabs vs. Soft TabsNächster: Bundestrojaner
Eingeordnet in: Computer

This weekend, I checked out "Second Life". Soon enough, I had my avatar modelled to real life specification: white hair, pale skin, gray, merciless eyes, an entirely black gown and a ceremonial battle staff in my hand.

What was expecting me beyond Beginner's Island was endless wastes of terrible aesthetics, combined with advertisings and much too obvious GET MONEY FREE scams.

Speaking of money, I come to the center of Second Life: it is all about money. Well, not all, but much. Second Life feels like the dark corners of the Internet I forgot about since surfing with an effective advertisement blocker; terribly colorful ads, many of them showing rather explicit content. Second Life, so I say, looks like what God - forbid me, The Divine CEO - has prepared for the followers of mammon: entrepreneurship virtually unrestrained.

It is clear that society within Second Life is divided - into those who have money, which are paying for the service and are thus entitled to land ownership and a steady income and those who have nothing at all. For them, there are ways to make some money here and there - dancing on dancing pads for L/15 minutes or to sit in "camping chairs" in order to fill up a sponsors place.

Somehow I'm astonished that I'm not more offended about the entire setting. Actually, I like the apparent lack of idealism - I've been on enough internet platforms to be fed up with idealism and people whining all the time about "back then when everything was better". Second Life does not even try to make a "better world" - it's just a more liberal world, without all the guardians that tell me how to behave and how not (apart from a few simple rules).

Actually, I think there's a chance within Second Life, to learn without getting hurt too much. Following an advertisement for something "FREE" to "make money", I of course ended up in some scammer's place that was geared to part me from my precious L. If I'd been stupid enough to fall for the scheme, well, I would have lost 10 game dollars, teaching me a lesson about trust and caution. In the real world, following a link to a website offering me something for "free" can be a bad, bad idea. So virtual capitalism could help to educate people.

I'm not sure which path I should take; the game offers several. That of the casual worker, which will earn his money on dancing pads and in camping chairs; those who really work, by creating new items and writing scripts or doing errands for others, and those who will own land and set up their own shops or event locations. At the moment, I mostly enjoy my avatar's looks and the few items I have created.

Dieser Text ist Teil der Serie Second Life

Second Life - Second Capitalism
Money and Second Life

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